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just_a_guy

just_a_guy

thispersondoesnotexist
Oct 27, 2023
141
Really well written. You've capture the essence of accepted societal norms and their unwavering conclusion that you can make decisions about your life only up to the point of whether you want to hold onto that life or not.
 
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DEATH IS FREEDOM

DEATH IS FREEDOM

Death is the solution to unsolvable problems.
Sep 13, 2023
608
Suicide and euthanasia is only about deciding the time of one own´s death. Pets are euthanized to avoid suffering so why should not the domesticated animal man have the right to die? In nature, animals and humans die before they become old and disabled. Civilization causes decades of pointless suffering for many people.
 
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N

nood11

Member
Jul 14, 2023
60
Suicide used to be thought of as a criminal action, but in modern society, the view has softened into seeing suicide as a result of mental illness. On SS, we often affirm that committing suicide is a decision we have the right to make because we have dominion over our bodies and lives. However, those who oppose pro-choice ideas often believe that people own their lives and bodies yet come to very different conclusions about suicide. This is due to operating under a different value system.

In this post, I will go over two related suicide topics. The first part of my post will address the value of life, suicide from the perspective of autonomy, and the rationality (or irrationality) of ending one's life. The second part will address the harms of standard suicide prevention tactics.


The Value of Life


Sheldon Solomon defined the cultural scheme of things to be "a shared lens for viewing life and reality that (a) gives life meaning and significance (b) is perceived as permanent and enduring over time (c) establishes the standards of values for individuals with the culture to live up to" (3). The cultural scheme of things can be thought of as the "symbolic world" that exists in each person's mind that not only gives people a means to integrate and process their experiences but also posits the nature of reality and lays down a framework of values and standards.

One value that is near-universal, so much so that it is thought to be self-evident, is life. To most, life is thought to be inherently valuable, an end rather than a means to an end, and requires no justification or explanation. There is often little philosophical reasoning provided for this idea that life is inherently worthwhile and valuable; for most, it is merely a feeling. This belief is, in essence, part of one's cultural scheme of things masquerading as objective reality. Anyone who disagrees with this idea is not only seen as wrong but as being pathologically out of touch with reality. There are, however, a few asymmetries in life that those arguing for its inherent good should answer for.

While some may regard life as a gift, it is undeniable that life comes with striving, and in many ways, this striving is asymmetrically tilted towards suffering. Negative states such as thirst, hunger, and old age (with all of its accompanying pains) come naturally, while one must strive not only to stave off or remove negative states but to reach positive states. In addition to this, one often spends far more time striving for positive states in relation to how long the positive state lasts. One pertinent example is the amount of energy, time, and oftentimes animal suffering it takes to make a meal yet how ephemeral the ensuing gustatory pleasure is. It is rarely denied that life is inculcated with striving, yet this view is often mitigated by arguing that one misses out on the pleasures that life brings when they die. But just as the time before one was born was not a deprivation, the time after one dies will not be either. In the words of Nabakov, who put it far better than I ever can, "The cradle rocks above an abyss, and common sense tells us that our existence is but a brief crack of light between two eternities of darkness. Although the two are identical twins, man, as a rule, views the prenatal abyss with more calm than the one he is heading for" (1).


Not only must we strive, we strive alone. A fundamental part of our inner selves is separated from others and while this gap can be indirectly bridged through the use of language, touch and other symbolic means such as art and music, every individual is ultimately alone in their own head. There is no one but them alone who experiences the suffering (or pleasure) that they are experiencing. We may share moments with someone else, yet they are never in that moment with us, ie, the qualia of those moments is something felt by us and us alone. Ernest Becker touched on this when he wrote, "We touch people on the outsides of their bodies, and they us, but we cannot get at their insides and cannot reveal our insides to them. This is one of the great tragedies of our interiority—it is utterly personal and unrevealable. Often we want to say something unusually intimate to a spouse, a parent, a friend, communicate something of how we are really feeling about a sunset, who we really feel we are—only to fall strangely and miserably flat" (207). It is therefore fitting that each individual should be able to ascertain whether the current costs of existence are worth it and how valuable the potential for future pleasure is relative to current suffering.

Mainstream suicide prevention

Suicide preventionists like to hide their paternalism under the guise of protecting a suicidal person's (or, in many cases, a suspected suicidal person's) "real, future self" from their "mentally ill and pathologically out of touch with reality current self." As I addressed in the previous part of my post, the view that suicidal people are pathologically out of touch with reality is unsubstantiated.

Perhaps the most vile method of suicide prevention is forcible psychiatric detention. In essence, this involves subjecting a suicidal person to what would otherwise be considered abuse, violence, and kidnapping if not committed against a suicidal person by medical authorities. Despite the good intentions of medical authorities, the phenomenological experience of the detained person is that of kidnapping and bodily violation. The voice of the suicidal person does not matter. If they try to resist, they will be violently forced into submission through either brute physical force, being tied down, or being drugged. Any other values that a suicidal person may hold, such as bodily inviolability or autonomy, are rendered null. The indignity of being forcibly detained is considered worth it by others if it saves a life, regardless of whether the person who is being subjected to forcible detention values their life more than dignity, autonomy, and bodily inviolability. This line of thought insinuates a deep lack of respect as respect entails allowing someone to act in their own best interests in accordance with their own values and not forcing them into following their "best interests" as defined by others. This also applies to many people who are mentally ill, as mental illness does not necessarily render someone globally irrational and all of their values (besides life) null.

As much as the mental health movement likes to talk about destigmatizing suicide, there is very little that is more stigmatizing than taking away someone's voice and violently forcing them into submission. Medical authorities have their hearts in the right place, yet they are subjecting another human being to cruel treatment on the chance that they will be grateful for it some day. Without a doubt some people are grateful, but it comes at the cost of making the dignity, autonomy, and peace of mind of a suicidal person disposable.

This is less of a suicide prevention tactic and more of an attitude. We all know this attitude well; it is the idea that suicidal people ought to keep living, and anything that is not prolife content is encouraging suicide. While suicidal people are often implored to choose life, there is no true choice unless one is allowed to do the opposite. By not allowing one to opt-out of life, pro-lifers see life not as a choice but as an obligation. If an adult cannot make an autonomous decision about what to do with their own body and life, then they do not own their body or life. This is an odious conclusion. I have had friends on this site who I deeply wish were still here, yet it was their life to take and do with it what they please, not mine to keep.

The zeal in which society wants to prevent suicide is fascinating because one is allowed to do many things that are analogous to suicide, such as cutting off all contact with loved ones or making life-altering irreversible decisions. This incongruence is once again caused by seeing life as inherently valuable and worthwhile.

I have written this post hoping that it will explain the "why" behind many of the ideas often expressed on SS. For anyone who has gotten this far, thank you for reading.

Postscript

It should be noted that I am not against suicide prevention - only the coercive means of doing so, such as throttling information and denying access to peaceful methods of suicide and locking someone up on the chance that they will end their life. These tactics cause someone to stay alive not because they voluntarily choose to live but because they have to. I am not pro suicide, I am pro voluntary life.

References
Nabokov, V. V., & Boyd, B. (1999). Speak, memory: An autobiography revisited. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

Solomon, Sheldon. Denying Death.

Solomon, S., Greenberg, J., & Pyszczynski, T. A. (2015). The worm at the core: On the role of death in life. Penguin Random House.
We are all ultimately alone in our own head. That's a hard fact not an imagined opinion. No matter how many people we have around us we are all ultimately alone. We have our own separate body and brain. That makes me very depressed to think about that because there's nothing I can do about it. I'm not surrounded by people and feel very alone. Maybe it's just best to accept that and try to make the best of it.
 
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BlockHammer

BlockHammer

Confused loser
Oct 25, 2023
216
The reason that i can think of about why do society are against suicide/euthanasia so much is because they affraid that it will set a bad precedent for the future and while that can be true, rather that fixing the actual problem, they just ignored that and instead try to gulid trip some sucidal person to stayed alive which is a horrible move to makes. But regardless they dont know how to actually fixed us, so they force us to live while ignoring the problem that make this person went suicidal
 
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M

Manfrotto99

Student
Oct 10, 2023
173
There has been a lot of studies that suggest poverty and lower socio economic conditions have much to do with suicide. I'm very tierd of hearing about mental illness as the main reason for suicide and often a precursor to poverty and drugs, rather than the other way around. It is however much easier to place the onus and responsibility on the individual to fix their illness and to hand out drugs, than it is to hand out money and fix the inequality of poverty and wealth distribution in the world.
 
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en-bat-y

en-bat-y

Member
Nov 4, 2023
22
There has been a lot of studies that suggest poverty and lower socio economic conditions have much to do with suicide. I'm very tierd of hearing about mental illness as the main reason for suicide and often a precursor to poverty and drugs, rather than the other way around. It is however much easier to place the onus and responsibility on the individual to fix their illness and to hand out drugs, than it is to hand out money and fix the inequality of poverty and wealth distribution in the world.
yea like in the hospital "you have anxiety so you feel sick" no i'm sick so i have anxiety, treating my anxiety hasn't worked because the cause isn't being addressed. it's really not hard to figure out that living situations can cause mental health issues but people really don't want/can't get to the root of the issues with how our society is set up.
 
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tvoisluga

tvoisluga

trapped in a body
Dec 22, 2023
96
Until we treat the problems at hand instead of the symptoms, we will continue to repeat the cycle as a society
this. this is the answer to all these people who are so shocked and wondering about everyone who ctb. sometimes people flat out tell what their problems are but are met with "uh, but others have it worse bro". so there will be more and more deaths the more time society has this mindset. im not even tryna blame them or scare them. It's just if you dont treat a problem it doesnt get solved 2+2 is 4 i dont make the rules but tbh im tired of talking and nobody listening thats why i wont leave a note because why should i think that they will listen for one time if they didnt for over 20 years.
 
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Return2themoonlight

Return2themoonlight

Sele'ne shall guide me to peace and tranquility
Dec 31, 2023
144
Suicide used to be thought of as a criminal action, but in modern society, the view has softened into seeing suicide as a result of mental illness. On SS, we often affirm that committing suicide is a decision we have the right to make because we have dominion over our bodies and lives. However, those who oppose pro-choice ideas often believe that people own their lives and bodies yet come to very different conclusions about suicide. This is due to operating under a different value system.

In this post, I will go over two related suicide topics. The first part of my post will address the value of life, suicide from the perspective of autonomy, and the rationality (or irrationality) of ending one's life. The second part will address the harms of standard suicide prevention tactics.


The Value of Life


Sheldon Solomon defined the cultural scheme of things to be "a shared lens for viewing life and reality that (a) gives life meaning and significance (b) is perceived as permanent and enduring over time (c) establishes the standards of values for individuals with the culture to live up to" (3). The cultural scheme of things can be thought of as the "symbolic world" that exists in each person's mind that not only gives people a means to integrate and process their experiences but also posits the nature of reality and lays down a framework of values and standards.

One value that is near-universal, so much so that it is thought to be self-evident, is life. To most, life is thought to be inherently valuable, an end rather than a means to an end, and requires no justification or explanation. There is often little philosophical reasoning provided for this idea that life is inherently worthwhile and valuable; for most, it is merely a feeling. This belief is, in essence, part of one's cultural scheme of things masquerading as objective reality. Anyone who disagrees with this idea is not only seen as wrong but as being pathologically out of touch with reality. There are, however, a few asymmetries in life that those arguing for its inherent good should answer for.

While some may regard life as a gift, it is undeniable that life comes with striving, and in many ways, this striving is asymmetrically tilted towards suffering. Negative states such as thirst, hunger, and old age (with all of its accompanying pains) come naturally, while one must strive not only to stave off or remove negative states but to reach positive states. In addition to this, one often spends far more time striving for positive states in relation to how long the positive state lasts. One pertinent example is the amount of energy, time, and oftentimes animal suffering it takes to make a meal yet how ephemeral the ensuing gustatory pleasure is. It is rarely denied that life is inculcated with striving, yet this view is often mitigated by arguing that one misses out on the pleasures that life brings when they die. But just as the time before one was born was not a deprivation, the time after one dies will not be either. In the words of Nabakov, who put it far better than I ever can, "The cradle rocks above an abyss, and common sense tells us that our existence is but a brief crack of light between two eternities of darkness. Although the two are identical twins, man, as a rule, views the prenatal abyss with more calm than the one he is heading for" (1).


Not only must we strive, we strive alone. A fundamental part of our inner selves is separated from others and while this gap can be indirectly bridged through the use of language, touch and other symbolic means such as art and music, every individual is ultimately alone in their own head. There is no one but them alone who experiences the suffering (or pleasure) that they are experiencing. We may share moments with someone else, yet they are never in that moment with us, ie, the qualia of those moments is something felt by us and us alone. Ernest Becker touched on this when he wrote, "We touch people on the outsides of their bodies, and they us, but we cannot get at their insides and cannot reveal our insides to them. This is one of the great tragedies of our interiority—it is utterly personal and unrevealable. Often we want to say something unusually intimate to a spouse, a parent, a friend, communicate something of how we are really feeling about a sunset, who we really feel we are—only to fall strangely and miserably flat" (207). It is therefore fitting that each individual should be able to ascertain whether the current costs of existence are worth it and how valuable the potential for future pleasure is relative to current suffering.

Mainstream suicide prevention

Suicide preventionists like to hide their paternalism under the guise of protecting a suicidal person's (or, in many cases, a suspected suicidal person's) "real, future self" from their "mentally ill and pathologically out of touch with reality current self." As I addressed in the previous part of my post, the view that suicidal people are pathologically out of touch with reality is unsubstantiated.

Perhaps the most vile method of suicide prevention is forcible psychiatric detention. In essence, this involves subjecting a suicidal person to what would otherwise be considered abuse, violence, and kidnapping if not committed against a suicidal person by medical authorities. Despite the good intentions of medical authorities, the phenomenological experience of the detained person is that of kidnapping and bodily violation. The voice of the suicidal person does not matter. If they try to resist, they will be violently forced into submission through either brute physical force, being tied down, or being drugged. Any other values that a suicidal person may hold, such as bodily inviolability or autonomy, are rendered null. The indignity of being forcibly detained is considered worth it by others if it saves a life, regardless of whether the person who is being subjected to forcible detention values their life more than dignity, autonomy, and bodily inviolability. This line of thought insinuates a deep lack of respect as respect entails allowing someone to act in their own best interests in accordance with their own values and not forcing them into following their "best interests" as defined by others. This also applies to many people who are mentally ill, as mental illness does not necessarily render someone globally irrational and all of their values (besides life) null.

As much as the mental health movement likes to talk about destigmatizing suicide, there is very little that is more stigmatizing than taking away someone's voice and violently forcing them into submission. Medical authorities have their hearts in the right place, yet they are subjecting another human being to cruel treatment on the chance that they will be grateful for it some day. Without a doubt some people are grateful, but it comes at the cost of making the dignity, autonomy, and peace of mind of a suicidal person disposable.

This is less of a suicide prevention tactic and more of an attitude. We all know this attitude well; it is the idea that suicidal people ought to keep living, and anything that is not prolife content is encouraging suicide. While suicidal people are often implored to choose life, there is no true choice unless one is allowed to do the opposite. By not allowing one to opt-out of life, pro-lifers see life not as a choice but as an obligation. If an adult cannot make an autonomous decision about what to do with their own body and life, then they do not own their body or life. This is an odious conclusion. I have had friends on this site who I deeply wish were still here, yet it was their life to take and do with it what they please, not mine to keep.

The zeal in which society wants to prevent suicide is fascinating because one is allowed to do many things that are analogous to suicide, such as cutting off all contact with loved ones or making life-altering irreversible decisions. This incongruence is once again caused by seeing life as inherently valuable and worthwhile.

I have written this post hoping that it will explain the "why" behind many of the ideas often expressed on SS. For anyone who has gotten this far, thank you for reading.

Postscript

It should be noted that I am not against suicide prevention - only the coercive means of doing so, such as throttling information and denying access to peaceful methods of suicide and locking someone up on the chance that they will end their life. These tactics cause someone to stay alive not because they voluntarily choose to live but because they have to. I am not pro suicide, I am pro voluntary life.

References
Nabokov, V. V., & Boyd, B. (1999). Speak, memory: An autobiography revisited. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.

Solomon, Sheldon. Denying Death.

Solomon, S., Greenberg, J., & Pyszczynski, T. A. (2015). The worm at the core: On the role of death in life. Penguin Random House.
I absolutely love the way you put it. Blessings for going into such grand detail on the thought of suicide. I slightly feel more at peace with my decision to CTB.
 
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inaminute

inaminute

Student
Dec 12, 2023
192
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FutureHanger

FutureHanger

fml
Dec 9, 2023
361
I think one aspect as to why suicide is seen as bad is because it's bad for those in power, although this view of mine is largely influenced by my politics I'll keep this vague and short to avoid turning this into a political argument. Basically those in power want more people alive because the more people alive there are, the more workers, consumers, potential soldiers etc. they have, I'd even argue it's the main reason anti abortion is supported by some powerful people as opposed to classic patriarchal/religious motives against it. Less humans is bad for those in power and more humans is good, sure there's individuals amongst us who oppose it for other reasons like religion or paternalism but the people in power fighting so hard against suicide aren't doing it for those reasons, they're doing it because it's profitable, they don't care about our suffering, the same people using kids as slaves for cheaper goods and bombing countries to no end for oil obviously could care less about how we feel, after all most mental health narratives revolve not around making us feel better but around making us more "productive", if someone with depression is high functioning enough to still work well then they're cared about less and it's even glorified that you just "push through" the sadness and continue to hustle while stuff like ADHD is treated with drugs that allow adults with ADHD to work better because it's not about making us feel better, it's about us being more useful for those in power, why do you think people with depression are called "lazy"? It was never about making us happy. We can fight pro lifers all we want but the underlying issue is that we live in a system where most people are only cared about so long as they make the rich and powerful even more rich and powerful, we'll never get a society that truly is tailored to suit people's mental needs and allows assisted suicide until the system changes.
 
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divinemistress36

divinemistress36

Visionary
Jan 1, 2024
2,396
I wish there was an easy painless way to go
 
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aslongasiremember

aslongasiremember

Member
Oct 8, 2022
7
I wish there was an easy painless way to go

Same. I never asked to be here so let me leave in a humane way.

The whole "you don't really have bodily autonomy" point hit me. I feel like a slave to society.
 
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A

Argo

Specialist
May 19, 2018
355
For me it's about the more one knows. And the more one knows, the more the fantasy narratives and cultural narratives you were raised in, become grotesque-- and this puts a vile taste in ones mouth insofar one is aware of this and has to live another day, let alone finish their lifetime. All that hero bullshit, all that happy ending bullshit. The reality is the world is a dark place, where power is the top game in town. It's the villains who win, and the villains appear as heroes. Any other game worth playing has to submit to the power game by definition. What is it you want to aspire to in life? Art? Well the power game decides if you get to aspire to it. Maybe you want the truth game, or the knowledge game? Again, that must bend the knee to the power game, ultimately, because truth does not lead to power, only raw power does. Some truths cause you to be powerless because you can't contain that truth or make it useful, it just becomes a cancer in your mind.
What about goodness? Surely that's the most noble game to play. But again, the goodness game does not beat the power game. No game beats the power game. This is the darkest truth in all of existence, and it's so obvious that it sounds stupid to even say it: Power wins everything. There's no happy ending when power is what ultimately wins. Not goodness, not art, not beauty, not truth, only power. There's nothing "good" about power, it's just sheer dominance and force. It's what you see when you look at animals getting eaten alive. You see a more powerful being saying, "Fuck you, I matter more than you, I am indifferent to your suffering. You exist for my benefit". It's functionally the same thing as how the most powerful humans organize society into a hierarchy where large masses of unfortunate people get sacrificed for the goals of those who get to inherit power. It only gets worse when you realize that all gender dynamics are a function of maximizing power. You can never truly love someone, and they can never truly love you, because you're this insane monkey and so are they, and they're wired to feed into this system that ultimately only cares about power. That's why you'll never be happy. That's why only darkness obscured in more bullshit stories await the future, all fueling and pumping this engine of mindless power.

Either one is disgusted by this, ignorant of this, indifferent, or enjoys this. It's lose/lose/lose/lose in every case. This is the main reason I want to go.
 
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F

fxxhan175

-
Jan 7, 2024
22
Very well written.

I think most people are delusional in the sense that human life is far more important than every other life form on this planet. We are no more important than the ants beneath our feet.

From a lot of people i've spoken to, involuntary commitment has done far more harm than good. For me, it really didn't do anything, I had a more neutral experience but it still was far from good.

Until we treat the problems at hand instead of the symptoms, we will continue to repeat the cycle as a society.
Very true. Commitment actually made me more inclined to ctb because it dehumanizes you and makes you into some kind of "lesser than" being. Not allowed to even attend to your most basic needs without someone watching your every move. Makes you feel like you're in a zoo. They only care about sedating you to the point where you're too lethargic to SH or attempt to ctb and then release you back into society. The resources they claim to provide are extremely basic and cookie cutter and aren't viable solutions for everyone.
 
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Oguzok

Oguzok

there is no self to kill
Nov 24, 2023
39
Nice post!! I picked up something new for myself from here
 
P

PieEater

-
Feb 5, 2024
3
Apart from admiring the style of your prose and the clarity of your thinking, I would like to thank you for expressing a line of thought that I have been considering for a number of years but cannot find adequately represented elsewhere. More needs to be said in society at large about the possibility of individuals of sound mind and body simply making a rational decision that the cons of continuing day to day outweigh the pros.

I am 54, but still have to be selective with my friends when talking about a time when I might simply have had enough living. Considering the idea of having had enough living cannot be conflated with evidence of mental illness. I absolutely believe that it's possible to entirely rationally make the assessment that the future doesn't look like it's worth the effort

For a man of my age, it's pretty much all downhill from here. For me specifically, I hated working, but was good enough at it to be able to semi-retire at 46. I've had a very full life - expensive education, wild teenage and twenties, widely travelled, good career, owned my own house outright before I was 40, married for 20 years before I divorced 5 years ago. I have no family, no dependants and no friends so close to me that I'd consider staying alive solely to avoid causing them pain, although I am sensitive to their potential upset. Taking the picture as whole, I have very few regrets. But the future looks like a slow decline into ill health and increasing boredom and isolation. And I'm terrified of mental decline.

There's clearly a substantive difference between wishing to harm yourself, by which I mean experience pain - which I would equate with mental illness of some sort - and just ending the grind of living. I lost my faith in the human species a good many years ago, and feel no compulsion anymore to try and make the world a better place - other by having one less human in it.

I feel in many ways like I'm just waiting to die. If there was a painless method, a red button marked 'EXIT' I could press, I would have done so by now. But I'm afraid of the pain; even more so of the idea of failing and being incapacitated. So tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow...
 
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Whiston72

Whiston72

Member
Jan 6, 2024
16
Brilliant post PieEater. I am 51 now and feel life is just repetitive weary game. The same things you saw twenty years before being rehashed in a different way. Sadly, I did not have the wild teenage or twenties (my first serious girlfriend left me saying that 'I was too quiet for my own good') and don't even have the memories to fall back on.
We need a massive expansion of services like Dignitas which are open to people with deep sadness as well as terminal illness in my opinion.
 
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T

TiredOfAllThis

Arcanist
Feb 5, 2024
447
How I am planning to do it:
1. Tell my partner I'll be out with friends until a bit later.
2. Leave at about 6 pm and wait in some Airbnb until about midnight. Prepare a note - a delayed message to my partner and psychologist should do.
3. Get to the bridge at about 0.30-1.00 am, attach the cable to the lamppost
4. Climb over railings with the noose on my neck. That should be swift.
 
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Stock Man

Stock Man

Member
Jan 7, 2024
12
I wish more people could think about suicide this way. I wish people would take the time to try and understand what's really going on instead of just pass it off as a phase or something that can be fixed
 
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S

swankysoup

Member
Feb 12, 2024
22
I wish more people could think about suicide this way. I wish people would take the time to try and understand what's really going on instead of just pass it off as a phase or something that can be fixed
Yeah, i hate the saying "suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem". Like who decided that? If you look around it's obvious that many problems people have aren't temporary.
 
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fly

fly

YOLO
Feb 29, 2024
19
Suicide is not about death. Its about the way to end yours and other ones pain by stopping your existence but you will never be able to delete the momories of the past.
 
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DOKTOR_G'HUL

DOKTOR_G'HUL

Member
Mar 16, 2024
25
Fascinating. Thank you for offering this as a option.
 
Christopher Reeve

Christopher Reeve

Ein wunderschöner Baum um sich zu erhängen
Mar 27, 2024
74
From my point of view, people suffer from Polianna syndrome, based on the fact that all beings that reproduced saw some value in life, and everyone that exists descends from these people, which is why they are configured to the optimistic bias
That's why they can't see the negative side of life in its entirety, or even realize that it is the true essence of reality.
 
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ChiefSeattle

ChiefSeattle

Member
Apr 3, 2024
25
Seeking travel buddy from UK to travel to Lima Peru (one way) for H 🇵🇪
 
DOKTOR_G'HUL

DOKTOR_G'HUL

Member
Mar 16, 2024
25
Finally back here; was having trouble ( yeah, that kind. ). I just look at the comments made by people who think suicide is off or wrong or in any way negative, and all I can say is what I've said since high school: It's not much more than getting tired of being in the play, and deciding to take the mask and costume off and leave the stage. I was happy before I was born, and I'll be just as happy when I go back into the nothing.
 
T

tommywest

New Member
Mar 17, 2024
4
cosa usare per suicidarsi velocemente senza soffrire troppo. aiuto
 
I

imdoneforreal

Member
Apr 24, 2024
21
The part about suicidal people being "out of touch with reality" in regards to mainstream suicide prevention efforts… thank you for that explanation. There is this thought that if you want to CTB, you are clearly disconnected from reality and that is so far from true. I am way too connected to reality. It's reality that has brought me to this place.

Or if you want to kill yourself, you are sick/need meds/need to be locked up and observed. It's wild. And I got locked up and medicated. Life was no different once I was released. All my problems remained. In fact; I was more traumatized.

I'm not stupid. I'm well aware of what my present and future look like, and I'm not interested in it.
 

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